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1 12, 2016

Britain tackles national obesity crisis

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

‘Daily mile’ craze in Britain hopes to tackle national obesity crisis

November 30 at 2:53 PM  The Washington Post

Karla Adam/The Washington Post

Torriano primary school in north London doesn’t have lush green grounds or an outdoor running track or a leafy campus quad.

But on most days, its students do something that is being replicated in schools across the country: They put down their pencils, step into the great outdoors and run a mile.

For one ruddy-faced 9-year-old who was breathing heavily after his run, the experience “makes me feel like I’m proud of myself” and means that “during lessons, I can concentrate a bit more.” On a recent day that looked like autumn but felt like winter, he joined his classmates in lapping the perimeter of his Victorian school 12 times before heading back inside to get on with his day.

Every day, tens of thousands of schoolchildren across Britain — in addition to regular physical-education classes — run, jog or walk a mile under a voluntary scheme dubbed the “daily mile.” They don’t change clothes. They don’t compete. They don’t know when their teacher will give the green light to rush outside.

But at some point during the day, come (non-torrential) rain or shine, children complete a mile.

Continue reading here.

1 12, 2016

Children’s Therapy Clinic receives 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00
© The Oberports, www.theoberports.com /// www.facebook.com/theoberports

photo courtesy of Children’s Therapy Clinic

Children’s Therapy Clinic $35,500 (Health) The second year of collaboration between Children’s Therapy Clinic and Bright Futures Learning Services will continue to provide appropriate therapy services for children with disabilities who have insufficient insurance coverage and/or income. Bright Futures Learning Services will provide behavioral treatments to children with autism and related disorders. Funding will support staffing, collaborative workshops, and materials.

“Without this support these children may not receive the therapy services they need to help them increase skills and become more independent.” – Valicia Leary, Executive Director, Children’s Therapy Clinic

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period.

Read more in the Foundation’s Fall 2016 newsletter here.

30 11, 2016

Freshman awarded Kids’ Chance Scholarship

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

Scholarships benefit students whose parents experienced workplace injuries

Chris Stadelman, chief of staff for Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, recognizes Emma Hyson, left, whose father was severely injured in a workplace accident.

Brad McElhinny/MetroNews
Chris Stadelman, chief of staff for Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, recognizes Emma Hyson, left, whose father was severely injured in a workplace accident.

WV Metro News: By in News | November 29, 2016 at 6:57PM

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The price her father paid on the job is helping Emma Hyson pay for college.

Hyson, a freshman at the University of Charleston, is a pre-pharmacy major. She is a beneficiary of Kids’ Chance, which provides scholarships to West Virginia students who have a parent who was seriously, catastrophically or fatally injured in a work-related accident.

Hyson was honored, along with the program, at the state Capitol on Monday. Her father, who lost the lower parts of both legs in a workplace accident before she was born, was there and proud.

“I didn’t know about it until about this time last year when I was applying for scholarships and came across the Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation and found out I qualified because of my dad,” said Hyson, a Parkersburg South High School graduate.

Her appearance at the Capitol came as Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin recognized Kids’ Chance Awareness Week in West Virginia. The program was established in this state in 1998 under then-Gov. Cecil Underwood. Since its inception, the organization has provided more than $150,000 in scholarships to West Virginia students.

Continue reading here.

30 11, 2016

Try this! WV receives 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

try-this-taken-by-east-end-family-resource-center

Photo courtesy of WV Healthy Kids and Families Coalition

WV Healthy Kids and Families Coalition $42,200 (Health) This grant will support “Try this! WV” for a second year; this project aims to knock WV off the worst health lists, by awarding community teams within TGKVF’s six-county region with mini-grants. Each grant-awarded team will also receive training, coaching, and technical assistance to implement a healthy lifestyle project in their communities. Funding will support staffing and at least 12 mini-grant awarded teams within TGKVF’s service area.

“Try This West Virginia is starting to make history in Appalachia – having recruited, trained, funded, and supported 153 community-led teams across the state… each of those teams is fueled by local leaders, who are committed to knocking West Virginia off the top of the worst health lists. ”

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period.   Read more in the Foundation’s Fall 2016 newsletter here.

29 11, 2016

Opid Abuse Crisis

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

cynthia-persily-214x300

Photo courtesy of Highland Hospital

Perception! Blame! Policy! More than an addiction

We’ve all seen the headlines. West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation…Why the opioid epidemic is so bad in West Virginia… Acknowledging West Virginia’s drug problem…Addicted State…these are just a few. In my organization, we treat people in the grip of addiction every day. Whether we are caring for adults in our hospital who have been self-treating their psychiatric diagnoses with illicit or prescription drugs, or children who have experienced the trauma inflicted through living in an environment where drug use is rampant, or we are caring for people who come to us for help withdrawing from alcohol or drugs, we are seeing every day the ravages of substance use disorder. It’s not easy for our patients, it’s not easy for their families, it’s a struggle for our communities, and it’s a stressor for our care providers. But the bottom line—there is hope. Let’s talk about Substance Abuse Disorder (SAD). Substance Abuse Disorder is a chronic brain disorder with a chance for recurrence. Like any other chronic disease, the impact of SAD is felt in many parts of an individual’s life. Work or school might be impacted. Relationships may be affected. Routines may be altered because of the chronic disease. And, most importantly, care and attention is needed to control the chronic disease. Understanding addiction as a brain disease has significant implications for the public perception of addicts and their families, for addiction treatment practice, and for aspects of public policy. What about perception? More and more we are hearing the discussion of addiction as a chronic disease. This shift in perception will help as we develop prevention and treatment programs and get away from the thinking that the person with SAD is to “blame” for their disease. The need to remove the stigma of addiction is never more important than today. Treatment services will only work if those who need them feel comfortable seeking them out.

Please continue reading here.

29 11, 2016

Keys 4 Healthy Kids 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

3rd Quarter Grants Update

keys-imagination-station-in-st-albans-learning-to-taste-the-rainbow

Photo courtesy of Keys 4 Healthy Kids

Keys 4 Healthy Kids– CAMC Health Education and Research $28,510 (Health) Keys 4 Healthy Kids received a second year of funding to expand its KEY 2 a Healthy Start program, which provides edible gardens and outdoor natural learning environments for low-income child care centers in the Kanawha Valley. The program works to improve the nutrition and physical activity environment for children at child care centers. A total of ten child care centers (eight new and 2 returning) will receive services. Funding will support staffing and materials as well as construction of the gardens and natural learning environments.

“We are grateful to work with TGKVF in order to provide assistance in helping children have creative and more active play spaces. In addition, children learn how to grow and eat fruit and vegetables. Developing these habits at an early age will last a lifetime.” – Laura Dice, Project Coordinator, KEYS

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period. Read more about the Foundation’s 3rd Quarter distributions in the Fall 2016 newsletter here.

28 11, 2016

Foundation hires new CED Program Officer

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

todd-dorcas-oct-2016

Foundation hires new Community Economic Development Program Officer

Todd Dorcas came to The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation after nine years with the West Virginia Department of Transportation’s Division of Public Transit (DPT) where he was charged with implementing the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) State Safety Oversight (SSO) Program over the PRT or Personal Rapid Transit in Morgantown WV. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree from West Virginia State and attended graduate school at Ball State University’s College of Architecture and Planning. Shortly after graduate school, he became the Executive Director of the King Park Area Development Corporation where he assisted the city of Indianapolis with an awarded $4.5 million grant from HUD to demolish vacant and blighted houses, build 269 new homes and rehabilitate 44 homes, improve streets and infrastructure, and develop a system of parks and green space. Today, this project is known as “Fall Creek Place” and has become one of the country’s most successful residential/mixed-use redevelopment projects. Fall Creek Place has won several national design awards and has been designated as best practices in several categories from architecture to redevelopment. Mr. Dorcas later went on to work for the city of Indianapolis as a city planner specializing in writing zoning ordinances and land use.

Todd is a current board member for the Kanawha County Emergency Ambulance Authority and an avid golfer.

Todd can be reached at 304.346.3620 or tdorcas@tgkvf.org

22 11, 2016

Giving Tuesday

2017-04-17T17:55:15+00:00

2016-gt-logo-wdate1

This November 29th, join the movement and give – whether it’s some of your time, a donation, gift or the power of your voice in your local community.

It’s a simple idea. Whether you come together with your family, your community, your company or your organization, find a way to give back and then share your idea.

Giving Tuesday was created as an annual day to give back, following the busy days of Black Friday and Cyber Monday.  The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation is proud to offer these easy ways to share kindness on this global day of giving

gkvf_logo_new-01

Give to our Urgent Needs Fund.
Help support our non-profit community meet emergency requests.

Woman giving bowl of soup to man

Give to your TGKVF Fund.
The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation donors can always continue to give by adding to their fund. Your donation on Giving Tuesday increases the value of your fund now to help prepare for future giving, and qualifies as a tax-deductible gift for 2016. Call the Foundation at 304.346.3620 with any questions.

 

gkvf_logo_bridge_block-01

 

#GivingTuesdayTGKVF

Please visit www.tgkvf.org on Tuesday or anytime to support the communities we serve.

21 11, 2016

WV children without a forever home for Thanksgiving

2017-04-17T17:55:15+00:00

Thousands of W.Va. children will spend Thanksgiving without a forever home

WSAZ News Channel 3

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va (WSAZ) — Less than a week until the Thanksgiving holiday, families from across the state gathered at the South Charleston Memorial Ice Arena to celebrate adoption. The families were brought together by the WV Recruitment and Retention Collaborative (R&R).

By Jatara McGee  Posted Nov. 19, 2016

Saturday is National Adoption Day, and November is National Adoption Month.

The event was designed to recognize families from across West Virginia, who have opened their homes and their hearts to children in foster care and made permanent additions to their families.

“When you hear that the need is so big in the state that convinced us that we really just needed to take the chance,” says Rachel Kinder. She works for Mission WV, Inc. and just recently adopted a little boy she and her husband were fostering.

Last year, the couple began fostering the nine month old little boy, who soon after became in need of a permanent family. The adoption process was finalized in October. During the process, Kinder became pregnant with a little girl.

Read more here at wsaz.com

8 11, 2016

Looking past vote, U.S. coal country sees millennials as key to revival

2016-11-08T16:33:06+00:00

Carissa Sellards, a sophomore at WVU-Charleston, sits at a coffee shop in Charleston, West Virginia, U.S. August 23, 2016.    REUTERS/Valerie Volcovici

Carissa Sellards, a sophomore at WVU-Charleston, sits at a coffee shop in Charleston, West Virginia, U.S.

August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Valerie Volcovici

 

Looking past vote, U.S. coal country sees millennials as key to revival

By Valerie Volcovici | HUNTINGTON, WV

 

When Carissa Sellards talks to her West Virginia University friends about post-graduation plans, one dilemma keeps coming up – whether to stay in their home state or strike out for more promising opportunities elsewhere.

If recent history holds, over half of them will either not find work or leave the state, contributing to a brain drain of young talent that is pushing the state to try to reinvent its economy and break with a coal industry in long-term decline.

“Companies don’t come here to invest because they only associate us with coal,” said Sellards, a 20-year-old sophomore who addressed the state legislature when she was in high school about the lack of opportunities for young people in a post-coal economy.

“Companies don’t come here to invest because they only associate us with coal,” said Sellards, a 20-year-old sophomore who addressed the state legislature when she was in high school about the lack of opportunities for young people in a post-coal economy.

Continue reading  here.