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14 12, 2016

Keep Your Faith Corporation receives funding

2017-04-17T17:55:13+00:00
Photo courtesy of Keep Your Faith Corporation

Photo courtesy of Keep Your Faith Corporation

Keep Your Faith Corporation $30,000 (West Side Initiative) Keep Your Faith Corporation seeks to expand its school garden efforts based at Mary C. Snow Elementary to all of its urban producers, including the community garden, SAGE, and “Produce Pedalers.” Through this grant, a permanent location for the West Side Farmers Market will be developed and children at Mary C. Snow will receive tokens to purchase produce that will be sold at the school. Funding will support an AmeriCorps VISTA, supplies for gardens, and the market development.

“The team is excited about this opportunity and ready to get to work.” – Dural Miller

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period.

Read more in the Foundation’s Fall 2016 newsletter here.

29 11, 2016

Keys 4 Healthy Kids 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

3rd Quarter Grants Update

keys-imagination-station-in-st-albans-learning-to-taste-the-rainbow

Photo courtesy of Keys 4 Healthy Kids

Keys 4 Healthy Kids– CAMC Health Education and Research $28,510 (Health) Keys 4 Healthy Kids received a second year of funding to expand its KEY 2 a Healthy Start program, which provides edible gardens and outdoor natural learning environments for low-income child care centers in the Kanawha Valley. The program works to improve the nutrition and physical activity environment for children at child care centers. A total of ten child care centers (eight new and 2 returning) will receive services. Funding will support staffing and materials as well as construction of the gardens and natural learning environments.

“We are grateful to work with TGKVF in order to provide assistance in helping children have creative and more active play spaces. In addition, children learn how to grow and eat fruit and vegetables. Developing these habits at an early age will last a lifetime.” – Laura Dice, Project Coordinator, KEYS

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period. Read more about the Foundation’s 3rd Quarter distributions in the Fall 2016 newsletter here.

14 10, 2016

Long-term treatment facility for women opening Nov. 3.

2016-10-10T19:15:06+00:00

Recovery Point of Charleston plans for Nov. 3 opening

October 9, 2016

The walls inside the former Mountaineer Gas building on Stockton Street have been painted in pastel pink and purple, bright blue and green. Beginning early next month, the 13,000-square-foot structure will serve as a 92-bed long-term treatment facility for women suffering substance abuse problems in the community.

Recovery Point of Charleston is scheduled to open Nov. 1, with a ribbon-cutting on Nov. 3.

The facility is the first of its kind for Charleston, said Matt Boggs, executive director of Recovery Point of West Virginia.

Read more here

 

8 11, 2016

Looking past vote, U.S. coal country sees millennials as key to revival

2016-11-08T16:33:06+00:00

Carissa Sellards, a sophomore at WVU-Charleston, sits at a coffee shop in Charleston, West Virginia, U.S. August 23, 2016.    REUTERS/Valerie Volcovici

Carissa Sellards, a sophomore at WVU-Charleston, sits at a coffee shop in Charleston, West Virginia, U.S.

August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Valerie Volcovici

 

Looking past vote, U.S. coal country sees millennials as key to revival

By Valerie Volcovici | HUNTINGTON, WV

 

When Carissa Sellards talks to her West Virginia University friends about post-graduation plans, one dilemma keeps coming up – whether to stay in their home state or strike out for more promising opportunities elsewhere.

If recent history holds, over half of them will either not find work or leave the state, contributing to a brain drain of young talent that is pushing the state to try to reinvent its economy and break with a coal industry in long-term decline.

“Companies don’t come here to invest because they only associate us with coal,” said Sellards, a 20-year-old sophomore who addressed the state legislature when she was in high school about the lack of opportunities for young people in a post-coal economy.

“Companies don’t come here to invest because they only associate us with coal,” said Sellards, a 20-year-old sophomore who addressed the state legislature when she was in high school about the lack of opportunities for young people in a post-coal economy.

Continue reading  here.

11 12, 2016

Mission WV receives 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:13+00:00
Photo courtesy of Mission WV

Photo courtesy of Mission WV

 

TGKVF focuses its discretionary grantmaking on building community wealth and fostering collaboration. The recently funded partnership between the Appalachian Reading Center and The Bridge of Mission WV illustrates the collaboration the Foundation champions. The partnership, which began in 2015, targets students in kinship and foster care by providing high-quality tutoring and reading remediation services in Clay County Schools. Within six months, the program has yielded impressive results as students, grades K-8, receive one-on-one, intensive tutoring. For the first time, many students are able to really understand how letters and sounds work together to form words. One student reported

“I actually want to try to read out loud. I never wanted to read out loud before.” Another student told her parent, “I don’t dread school anymore because I know I’ll be able to figure it out now.”

While the students’ capabilities have increased, their attitudes toward learning and reading, and themselves, have also been transformed.

Mission WV $55,629 (Education) In its second year of collaboration with TEAM for WV Children’s Fostering Futures program and other partners, Mission WV’s project “The Bridge” will continue to serve foster children and their caretakers in TGKVF’s six-county region through mentorship, advocacy, and support services. Funding will assist with academic support, staffing and mentoring, self-sufficiency coaching, and enrichment activities for foster youth.

Read more in the Foundation’s Fall 2016 newsletter here.

29 11, 2016

Opid Abuse Crisis

2017-04-17T17:55:14+00:00

cynthia-persily-214x300

Photo courtesy of Highland Hospital

Perception! Blame! Policy! More than an addiction

We’ve all seen the headlines. West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation…Why the opioid epidemic is so bad in West Virginia… Acknowledging West Virginia’s drug problem…Addicted State…these are just a few. In my organization, we treat people in the grip of addiction every day. Whether we are caring for adults in our hospital who have been self-treating their psychiatric diagnoses with illicit or prescription drugs, or children who have experienced the trauma inflicted through living in an environment where drug use is rampant, or we are caring for people who come to us for help withdrawing from alcohol or drugs, we are seeing every day the ravages of substance use disorder. It’s not easy for our patients, it’s not easy for their families, it’s a struggle for our communities, and it’s a stressor for our care providers. But the bottom line—there is hope. Let’s talk about Substance Abuse Disorder (SAD). Substance Abuse Disorder is a chronic brain disorder with a chance for recurrence. Like any other chronic disease, the impact of SAD is felt in many parts of an individual’s life. Work or school might be impacted. Relationships may be affected. Routines may be altered because of the chronic disease. And, most importantly, care and attention is needed to control the chronic disease. Understanding addiction as a brain disease has significant implications for the public perception of addicts and their families, for addiction treatment practice, and for aspects of public policy. What about perception? More and more we are hearing the discussion of addiction as a chronic disease. This shift in perception will help as we develop prevention and treatment programs and get away from the thinking that the person with SAD is to “blame” for their disease. The need to remove the stigma of addiction is never more important than today. Treatment services will only work if those who need them feel comfortable seeking them out.

Please continue reading here.

11 10, 2016

Philanthropy: The New Prada?

2017-04-17T17:55:15+00:00

THE BLOG/Huffington Post

Philanthropy: The New Prada? Competitive Altruism And The Rise Of Philanthropy As The Ultimate Status Symbol

10/06/2016 04:03 pm ET

The Native American Kwakiutl tribe has an unusual practice called potlatching, where tribal chiefs compete to give away their possessions. Strange, but the person who is able to give away the most resources is regarded as the highest-standing member in the group. Anthropologists have observed similar cases of “altruistic signaling” in numerous hunter-gatherer societies, including the Aché of Paraguay and the Meriam of Australia.

Read more here

17 01, 2017

Policy Institute happening in Charleston January 26, 2017

2017-04-17T17:55:09+00:00

 

 

This year, perhaps more than any other in recent memory, promises to bring big changes to both federal and state government. What can nonprofits expect and how do we join together to advocate for our sector and the people we serve?

Find out at our Third Annual Policy Institute: Critical Partnerships for West Virginia’s Future, in Charleston, presented by the West Virginia Nonprofit Association and Philanthropy WV. The Institute is designed to support and engage foundation and nonprofit staff members, board members, volunteers, and supporters in the legislative process. Whether you’re a public policy beginner or an advocacy expert, this program is geared to anyone with a desire to advocate for public policy issues that are of concern to your nonprofit, foundation, and community. This year’s agenda includes:

  • Featured keynote “What Do Changes in Washington Mean for West Virginia Nonprofits and Foundations?” from David Thompson, VP of Public Policy for the National Council of Nonprofits.
  • Breakout sessions: Using Data to Tell Your Story, Advocacy and Lobbying 101, and Debriefing Successful Advocacy Efforts.
  • Networking lunches grouped by policy issue.
  • Panel discussion including leaders from the WV Senate, WV House of Delegates, and the Governor’s administration.

Third Annual Policy Institute:
Critical Partnerships for West Virginia’s Future

January 26, 2017
10:00 AM – 3:15 PM
WV State Capitol
Charleston, WV

WVNPA/Philanthropy WV Members $25
Nonmembers $50

 

Register Today
12 12, 2016

Recovery Point of Charleston receives 3rd Q funding

2017-04-17T17:55:13+00:00

recovery-point-logo-final

Recovery Point of Charleston $12,500 (Basic Needs) Recovery Point of Charleston, a long-term, residential recovery program for women suffering from addiction, will be housed on Charleston’s West Side. Funding will be used to support the basic needs of homeless women seeking recovery.

“Recovery Point Charleston will serve 92 clients at no cost to them. Some basic needs are provided for our clients as they work to complete a structured, intensive 12 Step-based recovery program.” – Lara Lawson

At its September 21, 2016 meeting, The Greater Kanawha Valley Foundation (TGKVF) Board of Trustees approved the distribution of eighteen grants (18) totaling $864,570. Of that total, $614,570 will be disbursed over a one-year period and $250,000 will be disbursed over a five-year period.

Read more in the Foundation’s Fall 2016 newsletter here.